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Safe Communities Act Fails to be a Solution

The recent forum organized by St. Matthew’s church members was to learn about the Safe Communities Act, S1305, introduced by Acton State Senator James Eldridge. The parish’s ultimate goal is to guarantee the safety of immigrants both legal and illegal as understood by Christian teachings.

 

Senator Eldridge directed his remarks at the ways in which his Act would ensure that law enforcement and other authorities in Massachusetts would not assist Federal officials doing their job. Outlawed would be honoring ICE detainers and administrative warrants; using State, city or town funds to support ICE; asking anyone about their immigration status; making an arrest or detaining a person for immigration purposes; transporting  a person; sharing data.  But they must provide and attorney and a translator when needed at our cost.

 

The Act demands that law enforcement, justice and elected officials ignore the oaths they took. This leads to the obvious conclusion that if government does not abide by the law then no one will. One could say this leads to anarchy. Certainly it leads to disrespect.

 

The Senator did not speak about improving how the government should or could protect the average citizen from dangerous repeating criminals. The Act does not mention protecting citizens from proven criminals. When questioned about this later in the program Senator Eldridge skirted the issue with calls for due process and the old myth that illegal aliens do not report crime for fear of being identified. He further cautioned that using ICE to enforce the laws of the nation is the start of a Federal Police Force. Oh no! He is forgetting the FBI, the DEA – all armed and all Federal and we are all still free. The senator does not believe that the Constitution protects citizens and not foreigners.

 

The senator has partial stories about illegal immigrants being arrested and detained by ICE and some deported even though they had never been arrested. These stories were of course tear jerking but lacking in depth and completion. Without facts and data they are just rumors. Just how many of these deportations of totally innocent people are taking place remains uncorroborated. On the other hand we read and hear, quite often and with explicit detail, substantiated reports about the molested child, the raped teenager, the stabbing victim and a man dragged by a pickup truck until dead to know that some of these people should not be allowed back onto the streets of Massachusetts.

 

Senator Eldridge’s Safe Community Act, S1305, panders to the emotions set up by left leaning media (propaganda). That was evident in his support for the May Day protest at the State House.

 

Being empathic to the plight of moral and productive people in our country illegally is certainly a noble and worthwhile endeavor. We all should be treated with respect and compassion. But protecting us all from physical harm cannot be put aside for political reasons. Despite how Senator Eldridge feels about our president, his job and the task at hand is to protect citizens. S1305 only addresses keeping illegal aliens safe from federal law and does nothing to keep us safe from physical harm.

 

Senator Eldridge needs to stop pandering for votes in his well populated districts; take some time to understand the concerns of others and remember that his job is first to represent the interests of citizens.

 

I urge you to make your feelings known to Senator Eldridge at (617) 722-1120 or at James.Eldridge@MAsenate.gov. You may also wish to notify Governor Charles Baker.

 

Charles Caliri

Northborough


Toxic Masculinity

I would have liked to have written about the End of an Error and the beginning of Draining the Swamp; but, I read a piece yesterday on CampusReform.org that I'm still having a hard time coming to grips with: Colleges are offering events and conferences to explore the violent tendencies of manhood.

Locally, the article hits home with: "UMass, Amherst, likewise, has a “Men and Masculinities Center” for students to “interrogate and deconstruct traditional forms of masculinity,” even offering a support group for male students “who violated certain aspects of community standards” that “consists of a series of structured activities and conversations designed to get participants to reflect upon their behavior and the ways in which adherence to masculine norms influenced their choices.”.

Men, it seems, are the new kicking post for the left.  I don't know about you, but I see this as a form of passive-aggressive bullying (you are bad but we can help you) and a complete waste of time and money (what are these conferences and events going to cost? What will they accomplish?). 

More importantly, what kind of message does this send to our sons who are attending these schools?  That they are inherently bad because they are men and need a support group and practice activities to learn how to not be men?  That their masculinity is a threat to the population? I keep hearing about the War on Women, let's talk about the War on Men!  I'm not an alumni of UMass; but if I were, I know what I would be telling them the next time they rang my phone for a contribution...

Strong Men: May we know them, may we love them, may we raise them!

Kim Shepherd


A Lesson on Socialism

I am not sure what our younger generation is learning in school about history or the world. It is shocking to me to see so many young students, supposedly bright college kids, waving the Bernie Sanders flag and waving the Hillary flag for her brand of socialism. If you know any of those smart young people send them this description of socialism in Argentina. (taken from the February 8 edition of The New American) Argentina A more instructive example is the case of Argentina, whose experimentation in socialism closely paralleled that of the U.K., but with far more damaging consequences. Like the U.K., Argentina possessed one of the world’s strongest economies in the years leading up to World War I (the 10th largest economy in 1913). Unlike the U.K., however, this economic strength was due more to accidents of geography than to enlightened public policy. Argentina is blessed with a vast and fertile agricultural belt, as well as abundant mineral resources. By the beginning of the 20th century, money was flowing into the republic on the River Plate, thanks to exports of beef, wheat, and wool. Her public debts were low, and her gold and silver reserves among the world’s largest. Like the United States, Argentina weathered several sharp recessions in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and emerged largely unscathed. Spared the ravages of two world wars, Argentina continued to prosper relative to most of the rest of the then-developed world; even the Great Depression took a comparatively minor toll. Argentina’s Achilles’ Heel has ever been political instability. Prone, like most of the rest of Latin America, to military coups, Argentina never developed the enduring enlightened legal traditions of the British or the Americans, and was far more vulnerable to radical socialist reforms. Argentina’s turning point came at the same time as Britain’s. In 1946, while Clement Attlee was beginning his postwar socialist transformation of the U.K., a brash young politico named Juan Perón was swept to power in Buenos Aires after electoral promises of land reform, social security, higher worker wages, and other elements of the socialist program. Perón encountered little legal or institutional resistance to his socialist reforms, which he enacted with a vengeance. Perón instituted a regime of wage and price controls (including such abuses as a 1947 law dictating restaurant prices and menus), clamped down on international trade, seized private property for the government, spent lavishly on infrastructure projects, built up labor unions — and paid for all of it by printing money. For a few years, Argentina was able to use wartime reserves to help pay for Peronist extravagance, but by the 1950s the bill had begun to come due, in the form of economic stagnation. Undeterred, Perón rolled out two Five Year Plans, the gist of which was to favor agriculture over industry. Wearied by the blizzard of new socialist controls, Argentines applauded Perón’s ouster in 1955 by yet another military coup. But the damage was done. Having had a taste of socialism and welfarism, Argentines were reluctant to let it go. During the 1950s and ’60s, what was generally a period of strong economic growth elsewhere in the developed world brought mostly economic decline for Argentina. Despite her enviable natural abundance, her economy continued to decline and massive public debt, coupled with soaring inflation, became permanent fixtures on the Argentine economic landscape. Chronic political instability continued as a succession of Argentine governments continued to try to make Peronist socialism work, but without success. It was Argentina’s unending malaise that led to a communist uprising in the 1970s, which was suppressed by yet another military coup. Argentina’s military junta, in turn, fell from power after its disastrous loss to Britain in the 1982 Falklands War, setting off one of the worst episodes of hyperinflation in world history. By the end of the 20th century, a prostrate Argentina was no longer able to service her gargantuan public debt, and defaulted on her obligations to foreign lenders at the end of 2001. This, the largest public default in history, ushered in a devastating depression and an unprecedented wave of crime and civil unrest that lasted for several agonizing years. Yet when the worst was over, Argentines, unchastened by 60 years of failed socialist experimentation, elected leftist Nestor Kirchner, who immediately began implementing tried-and-failed socialist nostrums such as price controls and the nationalization of private assets. By restructuring Argentina’s public debt and paying off some of it, Kirchner was able to postpone the evil day. But his policies, and those of his wife and presidential successor Cristina Fernández, continued the Peronist and socialist legacy, leading to a return to economic malaise and a second Argentine default in 2014. President Fernández blamed all of Argentina’s ills on wicked capitalists, as socialists are wont to do, but the historical record in Argentina is devastating to the case for democratic socialism. Argentina is an excellent cautionary tale of what even “a little” socialism can accomplish when it is allowed to operate unopposed. Socialism Argentine-style did not bring about the gulags and extreme despotism and impoverishment of true communism, but it led to civil war, military dictatorship (complete with tens of thousands of “disappeared” citizens), and economic devastation. It has created a culture of entitlement second to none (a former classmate of mine in Argentina, now living in Spain, recently told me that most of our Argentine high-school classmates from the late 1970s took government jobs and are now — in their early 50s — retired and pensioned). From once having the world’s 10th largest economy, Argentina now weighs in at about number 24, right behind Poland. But in terms of GDP per capita, the former jewel of South America has fallen to an abysmal number 54, just ahead of West African nation Gabon, and behind the likes of Kazakhstan, the Seychelles, and Equatorial Guinea. Charlie Caliri

Clowns to the Left, Jokers to the Right

The Northborough Republican Town Committee was reorganized in 2011 by activists from Northborough who found after trying to help State Legislative candidates, that there was no functional help for GOP candidates in Northborough.  Since 2011 we have participated in several campaign schools, even hosting one in Worcester.  We have knocked on hundreds of doors for various GOP campaigns, to collect signatures, etc... We advocate for good government locally and on Beacon Hill.  We have always been willing to work with any group for the betterment of our candidates and/or families.  Some of us even stood with members of the MTA in Worcester to protest Arne Duncan.

We also were aware of the dysfunction at the State Party and have advocated for positive change where we could - organizational based change, better support for RTC/RCCs, more help for candidates.  And some of those changes have slowly been made.

We strongly support Governor Baker and Lt. Governor Polito.  We made sure that Northborough sent a full slate of Delegates to our State Convention in 2014 and all voted for Charlie Baker.  We helped them with the work they asked us to do for them in Northborough.  We continue to support them in the work that they want to do on Beacon Hill. 

We DO NOT support their efforts to unseat experienced, effective State Committee Members that are elected by the towns in which they represent.  We particularly CANNOT support State Committee Members who have ZERO campaign experiences!

Inexperienced State Committee Members have been recruited to run by the left and the right factions of our Party.  We reject all of these candidates - whether recruited by either side.  We reject them because their responsibility as a SCM is to be "standing campaigns for GOP candidates".  We need campaign experienced State Committee Members for our candidates! This is simple stuff!

I see flyers coming in the mail from one side saying they need help continuing to fight for accountability and lower taxes, so I should support their candidate.  NEWSFLASH: These are not State Legislators!  Bonnie Johnson did nothing but support them, so what are they implying? That she didn't?  Not true.

I see information online from the other side asking to support their inexperienced candidate.  Do I look like a hypocrite? No, we won't support any inexperienced State Committee candidate because it would be disastrous for our candidates!

I want both sides understand we are motivated to fight for better governance for our families and our children.  We are not interested in being in the middle of an intra-Party battle.  We reject the inexperienced candidates recruited by both sides.  In Northborough, those inexperienced candidates are Kristina Spillane and Ann Barndt.  While I admire their willingness to step up, I cannot support their candidacies based on their inability to effectively support the candidates that we work so hard for.

Have you ever heard the saying that when you make everyone mad, you are doing something right?  Well, there it is. Clowns to the left, Jokers to the right, Northborough is stuck in the middle!

I respectfully ask that the voters at Proctor, Lincoln St & Zeh cast a ballot for competence - please re-elect Bonnie Johnson; for voters at Peaslee, - please re-elect Jeanne Kangas!

 

Kim Shepherd, Chair


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